The next morning. . .

Yesterday I ended up with almost 6 inches of snow. Evidently the one goat shelter was flatter on top and didn’t have the right arc. While the shelter is still functional, the sheep shelter didn’t fare as well.

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Not a White Christmas. . .

It snowed last night. When I let the dogs out this morning, I had to kick Kip out . . . although she later remembered that she liked playing in the snow.

Heading to the barn

Kip in the snow

This is the view from my gate. . . I am feeding for a friend and was very happy that my new(er) truck has four wheel drive as I actually needed it to reverse.

Kip and Fix

I’m glad someone is enjoying the snow. The sheep, goats and chickens are all sure this snow is totally my fault and they are NOT HAPPY. Since it is still snowing, I’m expecting a total of about 6 inches.

New Mexico “Snow”

New Mexico is well known for its windy conditions, usually in spring when the trees are starting to leaf out. However, yesterday morning while doing chores the winds were brutal in stripping leaves off the cottonwoods. There were brief bursts where so many leaves were swirling it was hard to see more than five feet in front of me.

If we were in England . . .

we would be celebrating Guy Fawkes day. However, here in the U.S. I’m celebrating my birthday.

My garden tower in the breakfast room (or as I call it, my home office) is flourishing. I’ve been making pesto from the basil and parsley to go along with the spaghetti squash from my garden and I should have enough lettuce for a couple of salads a week through the winter shortly.

Morning of 11/05/18

The weather was gorgeous today so I snuck away just before noon and Fix and I took a short hike in the Quebradas (about a tenth of a mile south of my gate.)

Last of the desert flowers

Fix perched on edge of Arroyo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had some rain a couple of weeks ago and the vegetation took advantage of the water and warmer temperatures.

I avoid the Quebradas when it rains because of the potential for flash flooding (the hikes are on the bottoms of arroyos) but it is nice to know that Fix could save himself if needed.

The cottonwoods are finally starting to change color. It won’t be long now before all the leaves are gone.

Heading Home

 

The Final Step

In July of 2017 a cottonwood came down during a thunderstorm and landed on the pipe fence of the horse corral with the tree canopy almost completely covering the corral. The horse was unhurt but trapped in the far corner of the corral. A friend came over the next morning before work to chainsaw enough of the tree so I could get the horse removed to another location. It took awhile to deal with the bee hive that had taken up residence in the trunk of the cottonwood but once that was accomplished, the rest of the tree was able to be cleared from the corral. That still left part of the trunk on the pipe fence itself but the remaining tree blocked the horse from getting out of the corral. A few weeks later, I was finally able to get the rest of the tree cut up and then used a piece of cattle panel as a temporary patch. Another friend with welding equipment and skills agreed to take a look and see if he could fix the fence. When he finally made it out, we talked about possibilities and I asked if, instead of replacing the two sections of fence that formed that corner, it would be feasible to cut out the damaged sections and replace it with a gate that fit diagonally across to the undamaged sections on either side. He went home and built a gate but it was over a month before he could fit in the time to bring the gate and his welding equipment out. Tonight, after a few mishaps, the damaged pipe and cattle panel was cut away and the new gate welded in place. It took over eight months, but everything is finally done – and I have two gates.

 

 

Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge

About 20 miles north is the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge. Unlike the Bosque del Apache, the Sevilleta is generally closed to the public. However, about once a month guided tours are offered to parts of the Sevilleta otherwise not accessible.

Yesterday a friend and I took advantage of one of these guided tours. The below photos are of the West Mesa – a limestone cap where the sides have eroded leaving a promontory which narrows and then widens again. This area is the result of volcanic activity which is still being monitored.

 

Odd Weather

The weather this fall was unusually warm. However, the cold weather has moved in with a vengeance this past week. The other morning it was in the teens when I got up and was still below freezing shortly after 9 am. I think the high  was only 43 degrees. I had scheduled a propane delivery for next week, mainly just to take advantage of the propane pricing I had locked in last year that will expire shortly; however, if this weather continues I may actually have need of the delivery.

The borrowed ram has returned home and I’m hoping that he bred at least one ewe while he was here. The hogs are now gone – it was apparent that they weren’t going to pay for themselves and I didn’t want to spend another winter having to carry water out to the pasture every day.

 

Autumn Gold

The weather has not been predictable for the past few years and this year has been no exception. It has been warmer than usual and the fall colors are just now peaking. I have only seen and heard a couple of groups of migratory birds over head – a far cry from the November ten years ago when I moved here.

Continuing Saga of Tree

The beginning of July a tree crashed into the horse corral. See post here.

While a friend came over early the next morning to remove the crown so I could get the horse out of the corral, because there was a bee hive in the tree, he couldn’t cut up the big pieces of trunk until I dealt with the bee hive. At the time he left the plan was for me to take care of the hive and he would return the next week to finish the tree removal. I was unsuccessful in finding anyone willing to remove the hive and so had to resort to killing the bees. Not my first choice but I needed to get the horse back into her corral. As it turned out, my friend’s schedule prevented him from returning. After the horse tried to jump out of the (former) sheep pen – now rebuilt – into the goat pen, mangling the cattle panel and injuring herself in the process, I went ahead and put her back in her corral where she has been co-existing with a large tree.

Yesterday in the late afternoon, the friends who had assisted with the bees returned with a chainsaw and removed the trunk up to the fence. At that point, the chainsaw quit and we decided it was good enough for the time being. It has certainly made a difference in the appearance of the corral – I had forgotten how large the corral really is.

Taming the wild tree

The heartwood of the cottonwood had rotted out, as is common in the species. This allowed access for the bees and while we found the center of the trunk full of dark, rich “compost” when we got to the section where the bees had resided, that was mixed with honey comb and honey. I had been toying with the idea of trashing my shoes — traipsing through the sticky mess left by the tree removal cemented that idea. I figured it wasn’t worth even trying to clean the shoes.

Hopefully sometime in the next couple of months the rest of the tree will be removed and I can find someone to repair the fence.

Hollow cores

Remnants of honey comb and honey