Life and Death

The other morning a yearling ewe (born in the spring of 2016) started to lamb. It soon became apparent that she was too small (or the lamb was too large) and that she was in trouble. However, since she was confused about the whole process, she wouldn’t allow me close enough to assist. As I was trying to move the ewe into the lambing jugs, the littlest triplet darted underneath her and started nursing – evidently aware that the ewe was other occupied and unlikely to chase her off. I moved the lamb off but she quickly returned, not so willing to give up a free meal. Luckily for me, the farrier was there and willing to lend a hand. Between the two of us, we managed to get the ewe into a lambing jug where we could close her in (and the littlest lamb out) and I ran to the house for gloves. The lamb was presenting correctly – two front hooves and a nose – but not progressing. There was so little space inside the ewe I was taking it on faith that there was only one lamb and it wasn’t tangled with a second one. By the time I finally was able to get a front leg (the elbow had caught on the pelvic ring) straightened out, the lamb’s tongue was hanging out and turning blue. While I was convinced I was going to lose the lamb, I wanted to save the ewe if possible so I continued to work until the second leg was straightened out. Even though the head looked like it wasn’t going to fit, finally with effort on both our parts, the head finally emerged. At that point I let the ewe finish the job and the rest of the lamb came out. I was pleasantly surprised to find the lamb still alive. Once the ewe had a few minutes to rest up, she did start to clean the lamb. A couple of hours later I went out to check and the lamb was up and nursing. A ram lamb weighing 12 lbs which is large for a Katahdin and especially large for a first time ewe.

So while the season had definitely gotten off to a very slow start, it was progressing well until . . . . When I went out to feed last night I found a lamb, the largest of the original set of triplets, next to the fence, dead. I couldn’t find any apparent cause of death. The ewe didn’t have enough milk for three lambs which is why I’ve been supplementing the smallest lamb, but I hadn’t seen any signs from the other two lambs that they weren’t getting enough milk. All of the lambs had been running around earlier in the day playing chase games and all, including this one, had appeared to be fine. My guess is that she ran into the fence and hit a fence post, breaking her neck.

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