18 Days. . .

Nutmeg kidded on September 24th. She is 18 days into her second lactation. This morning about 10:15 I pulled her from the lambing jugs where she has been residing with her three kids and put her in the doe pen for the day. Around 5:15 – about 7 hours later – I put her up on the milk stand.

2nd Freshening at 18 days lactation

2nd Freshening at 18 days lactation. She gave me 22.55 oz.

On her first lactation she gave me 22.0 oz after having been separated from her twin kids for about 12 hours.

Slopping Hogs

I repositioned the trough in the pig pasture the other day and then secured (I thought) it to the ground. I set it up away from the fence but close enough that I could use a section of PVC pipe to deliver milk from outside the fence. It worked well in the first use . . . .

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Accessible from either side and accommodates the five hogs without fighting.

Unfortunately, despite driving U-bolts through the feet and into the ground, it only took a short time for the hogs to turn it upside down. On to Plan B (once I think of Plan B.)

Least Favorite Task

I’ve written before about my dislike of disbudding goats. To get me through this process, which is high on my list of least enjoyable tasks, I cast my mind back to those instances where I have had to deal with goats who have gotten stuck in fences, and the couple of times when the goats have broken their necks in fences before I found them. Since the paste method has been ineffective more than it has worked, I had ordered an electric disbudder earlier this year. The first one I received was defective and the second one arrived too late for me to disbud Nougat’s twins.

I’ve been checking Nutmeg’s triplets daily as the timing of disbudding is critical to its success. While I was prepared to have to disbud them on different days, as it turned out, all three kids were ready for disbudding today. So this afternoon I plugged in the electric disbudder and gathered up the equipment I needed while it was getting hot. I started with the largest kid, the last born, and worked my way backwards since the first-born was, and still is, the smallest kid.

Here is the middle kid:

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After putting the kid in the box, I used scissors to clip hair away from the horn buds and then once the iron was hot enough, applied the tip of the iron for four seconds. After doing the second horn bud, I went back and reapplied the iron to the first horn bud for an additional four seconds. I repeated the process on the second horn bud as well just to ensure I had a good “copper ring” around each horn bud. (Though to be fair, it didn’t look copper as much as it looked charred to me.) If I have to do this, I want to make sure I do it right and don’t end up with scurs. Time will tell whether I was successful with any or all of the triplets.