Greenhouse

The previous owners of my place had left a metal gazebo screwed into wood strips, in turn screwed into the concrete pad. Over the years I kept telling myself I needed to take it down but never got around to it. A few months ago, I had a brilliant idea of turning the gazebo into a greenhouse. I also thought it could do double duty as an enclosed area to milk goats. The milking stand was on the deck, exposed to wind and rain, which translated into having to milk goats in the house in bad weather. However, in pricing out the polycarbonate sheets and other materials that would be needed, I came to the conclusion that it wasn’t going to be a feasible project. It did get me looking at pre-fab greenhouses though and I found a Palram Nature Series Mythos Hobby Greenhouse on Amazon for a couple of hundred dollars less than it was going to cost me to convert the gazebo (and the shipping was free).

So I ordered the greenhouse and on January 29th it was delivered. The delivery driver put it over the gate and my first two thoughts were: 1) something was going to be broken and 2) the box wasn’t nearly large enough to contain a greenhouse the size I ordered.

20160129_143821-1_resized

The box was too heavy for me to lift so I unpacked it at the gate and placed each piece in the back seat of my car to transport down the drive. Amazingly, nothing appeared damaged as I unpacked the box.

While I have no doubt that I could have (eventually) put the greenhouse up by myself, thankfully a (more skilled) friend came by on the 31st to put up the greenhouse for me.

# 1 - The first order of business was to take the gazebo off the concrete pad. # 1 – The first order of business was to take the gazebo off the concrete pad.

#2 - Then, each piece of the greenhouse was laid out. The instructions were simply diagrams - not my strong suit - and thankfully almost all the pieces had corresponding numbers to match the diagrams.

#2 – Then, each piece of the greenhouse was laid out. The instructions were simply diagrams – not my strong suit – and thankfully almost all the pieces had corresponding numbers to match the diagrams.

#3 - The next  step was to screw the frame into the wooden strips the gazebo had been fastened to.

#3 – The next step was to screw the frame into the wooden strips the gazebo had been fastened to.

#4 - Then the supporting framework was put up.

#4 – Then the supporting framework was put up.

Gradually more and more pieces were installed.

Gradually more and more pieces were installed.

20160131_125329_resized_2
Until finally the greenhouse was completed

Until finally the greenhouse was completed

Note the vent (and the milking stand already set up for use)

Note the vent (and the milking stand already set up for use)

20160131_171024_resized In addition to the milk stand, there are now cinderblock and board benches with two earthboxes planted with peas and beets.

About 2 am the next day, the winds started to howl and blow. I lay there just waiting for the crash foretelling that the greenhouse had been blown into a tree or the pumphouse. However, the wooden strips screwed into the concrete which had held the gazebo in place were also able to keep the greenhouse anchored. Several high winds later, the greenhouse is still anchored and I have a sheltered area to milk goats as well as a chicken proof place to grow additional vegetables.

Advertisements

2 comments


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s