Unusual Year

As mentioned before, I have never had a hen go broody until this spring. One of my Americana hens has been sitting a clutch of eggs since late April and according to my calendar was due to start hatching chicks out this week. I went out shortly after lunch today to find two chicks under her, along with more than a dozen unhatched eggs. A little internet research turned up the information that hatching may take place over 36 hours so I’m hoping to find more chicks tomorrow morning.

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And we have been having thunderstorms (and hailstorms) on a fairly frequent basis this spring. The past few years the weather has been unpredictable, but generally rain is more likely to occur with the summer monsoons. The extra moisture bodes well for the pasture and will hopefully mean I won’t need as much hay this year. Joey found a unique way to stay dry (or mostly dry) during this afternoon’s thunderstorm.

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Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night . . .

I have been looking at Icelandic Chickens for a few years now. With my predator problem now under control (still knocking on wood) late last year I started a diligent search for an Icelandic Chicken breeder who would sell me some chicks. Unfortunately, I was unsuccessful in finding anyone who would ship anything other than eggs. So the search was then on to find someone local who had experience (and success) in hatching eggs with an incubator.

A chance conversation earlier this year found me that person and so arrangements were made to have 18 fertile Icelandic chicken eggs shipped this spring after the temperatures had warmed up but before the temperatures were too high. Yesterday I received an e-mail stating that the eggs had been shipped and were due to be delivered on Thursday. Since a tracking number was provided I went ahead and set up text messages every time the package was scanned to ensure that I was able to get the eggs as soon as they arrived.

You can imagine my surprise when this morning I got a text saying the package had been scanned in on arrival in Albuquerque. A second text followed shortly thereafter that the package had been scanned on departure. Shortly after noon I received a phone call from the Post Office stating that a package marked “Hatching Eggs” had arrived.

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Carefully Wrapped

Carefully Wrapped

While the Icelandic is supposed to lay white eggs, these appeared more of a delicate cream

While the Icelandic is supposed to lay white eggs, these appeared more of a delicate cream

And the moral to this story is that if you need anything delivered quickly and efficiently by the US Postal Service, send it with a live chick or marked “hatching eggs” — the US Postal Service excels at these deliveries — letters, not so much.